Before the Oscars, a look at how big red became the thoroughfare of modern royalty

A French Deco Rug

“I am a mortal, a man; I cannot trample upon these tinted splendors without fear thrown in my path.” -King Agamemnon, from the Greek tragedian-playwright Aeschylus in the fifth century, BC.

Those were the words the good (fictitious) king said upon returning home to his plotting wife after leading his troops to victory in the Trojan War. The story goes, wife Clytemnestra laid out a crimson carpet to highlight her husband’s arrogance by having him trample on the color of the gods. He walks on the carpet, but only under protest. Later, depending on which version you read, Clytemnestra or her lover kills him. Because, you know – tragedy.

A Swedish Rug

Evidence suggests that, while there’s a nice mythical quality to tracing red carpet back to ancient Greece, the practice more likely originated at railroad stations. According to Live Science, President James Monroe received the red carpet treatment in South Carolina, his hosts laid red carpet along the river in his honor in 1821. But it was not until the 1900s, when the luxurious 20th Century Limited train from Chicago to New York had passengers board and disembark on a plush carpet that the idea fancy people deserved fancy rugs, i.e. “red carpet treatment,” took hold.

According to the director of the Academy of Motion Pictures’ Margaret Herrick Library Linda Mehr, the red carpet was added to the Oscars in 1961.

Doris Day (1)

Doris Day at the Oscars, 1961
Via: DorisDay.net (http://www.dorisday.net)

 The television broadcasts of the awards show switched to color in 1966, and ever since watching our favorite movie stars traipse down that sanguine, hallowed walkway has become our chief vicarious indulgence.  It would be hard to name a more popular, or more American, fantasy than getting to be part of the Hollywood glitz.

85th Annual Academy Awards - Arrivals

Jennifer Lawrence, 2013 Oscars
Via: The Gloss

So who is responsible for the actual red carpet at the Oscars? Today, it’s a man by the name of Joe Lewis. For seven years Lewis has been responsible for seeing that the carpet is ready and in place to carry the stars from their limos to the doors of the Dolby Theater. The carpet itself is 600 feet long and will be laid out today and vacuumed Sunday just in time for the wave of press to arrive.

Red is the color of blood and power. Cheerful, robust, vibrant, strong – a bold, red textile can imbue a bit of glamour and stateliness into any space, even if there’s no chance of Brad or Angie crossing the threshold. Check out DLB’s crimson textile tide here.

Color 2014 Radiant Orchid: Ideas and Inspiration for Next Year’s “It” Color

Radiant Orchid

International color guru Pantone declared next year’s “it” color Radiant Orchid, a bold blend of purple, pink and fuchsia.

Pantone’s influence is such that you can expect to see this color on catwalks, at design expos, in showrooms and beyond. Pantone’s experts considered a wide range of factors in selecting this pretty, pink-tinted purple – everything from art, film, economics, technology and global events have influence, according to their website.

While last year’s pick (emerald) referenced revitalization and growth, radiant orchid evokes creative energy and original thinking.

Purple is a powerful color. Before the new year arrives, here’s a look at how prescient designers have incorporated various shades, from deep violet to delightful mauve, into awesome rooms.

HGTVVia: HGTV 

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Art Deco/Art Modern Rugs – Streamlined and Sleek

If you like the beauty of simple and clean lines in modern houses, as well as in various house furnishings, it means you appreciate the value of Art Deco/Art Modern. This style is characterized by streamlined artwork such as clean lines and curves as well as bright colors, as opposed to the traditional intricate lines and ornate curves and dark colors of the past. This modern style originated in the period between the two world wars mainly initiated by the Bauhaus movement. The term Art/Deco was first used in L ‘Exposition Internationale des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Modernes which was held in Paris after World War I.

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The curvy and clean lines in this Art Deco Rug separate the soft tones of beige and browns, to help create a modern standout pattern.

The excellent reception given by the public to the superior elegance of the custom made interiors at the expo paved the way for interior designers to follow suit. Aside from the interior designers, other craftsmen, artists, and manufacturers all over Europe and America began to incorporate the innovative aesthetic ideas of Art Deco/Art Modern in their works. The streamlined character of the decorative arts of what is called the Machine Age began to appear in rugs and carpets in the mid-1920s to the 1930s.

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 A second quarter 20th century Art Deco rug exemplifies the art deco style with layers of abstraction and color.

At this time, dramatic changes in styles and patterns began to appear in furnishings and other decorative products. But the fad died a natural death in the 1940s. However, it came bouncing back in the late 1980s and through the 1990s. This modern art style is captivating because of its combination of versatility, luxury, function and cacophony of colours.

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Art Deco/Art Modern is essentially eclectic in nature because it combines Aztec and Egyptian elements. It makes extensive use of pyramidal shapes and strong and sharp angles. This art style also combines metal furniture with lacquered woods, together with geometric glass shades. You would be correct to say that some of its elements are caricature-like in appearance.

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Geometric shapes mixed with sharp angles and in this early 20th century French Art Deco rug.

 

 

Wear Our Rugs, Spring 2014 Looks!

Here’s a recap of the hottest Spring 2014 looks straight from Mercedes Benz Fashion Week, of course, paired with our always trendy collection of rugs.

A great quote to start off the show:
“Art evokes the mystery without which the world would not exist.” – Rene Margritte (Harper’s Bazaar, August 2013)

Balenciaga with tufted water rug

Balenciaga Dress                                            Contemporary Custom Rug, 10′ × 14′

BB0930 with Lela rose dress 2014

Lela Rose dress                                                     Art Deco Rug, circa: 1930, 9′ × 8’1″

BB2370 with Emerson dress

Emerson dress                          An Irish Rug designed by CFA Voysey, circa: 1920, 20’7″ × 13”

Image 4-BB4153 with Honor dress 2014

Honor dress                                           A Persian Tabriz Rug, circa: 1900, 15′ × 10’6″

BB4256 and Rebecca Minkoff dress2

Rebecca Minkoff dress                                      A Samarkand Rug, circa: 1880, 13’4″ × 5’2″

Image 6-N10685 with Altuzarra outfit

Altuzarra outfit                                                     Metal Blue Ombre Rug, 15’2″ × 12′

Rugs: Inspiring Art Deco Design

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In just a few days, Hollywood will be releasing The Great Gatsby.  The film starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Carey Mulligan is an adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic novel written in 1925.  A celebration of the jazz-era style of the 20s and 30s, The Great Gatsby promises to be filled with beautiful Art Deco style.  From the fashions to the architecture and interiors, at every turn we can expect to see the geometric forms and bold outlines that Art Deco is known for.  Once an exposition of the modernist decorative style that emerged in Paris in 1925, the glamorous style featuring luxe palettes of black and gold and cool zigzag designs can still be spotted in the skyline architecture of cities like New York, Chicago and Detroit.  Art Deco is making a comeback in 21st Century design, and you can discover it in a number of home accessories including the luxurious Art Deco carpets that are just waiting to bring a bit of 1920s glamour to your home.

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Known as the “Cathedral of Finance”, the Guardian Building in Detroit showcases the beauty of Art Deco design.  Geometric patterns in striking primary hues were painted on the building’s ceiling to create a stunning cathedral effect.

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Art Deco isn’t shy when it comes to luxury.  This building in black and gold, like the Empire State Building and the Chrysler in New York, is a monument to the time when this architectural style was supreme.

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Inside the EmpireStateBuilding a brass mural features many of the geometric lines you can expect to see in Art Deco design.  Rectangles upon rectangles make up the body of the building, and a mix of linear and zigzag shapes completes the mural’s design.

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This abstract rug features the beautiful geometric lines that Art Deco design is known for.  In a neutral color palette the mix of shapes doesn’t overwhelm the rug’s design, but instead enhances it.  Pair a rug like this with linear black furnishings to create a strong Art Deco statement.

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This rug was actually made in the 1920s when Art Deco style was on the rise.  The wavy gray chevron pattern was a popular design at the time, and still fits within today’s design trends.  A striped border adds even more geometric detail.

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Art Deco style was first spotted in Paris.  This French Deco Rug shows the beauty of the design that was coming out of France at the time.  A mix of cool shapes creates an attention grabbing-rug in soft hues of brown and ivory.

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The geometric motif on this Swedish rug is a subtle showcase of Art Deco design.  In more subdued tones, the strong graphic lines stand out in this neutral rug design.

Explore the beauty of Art Deco style by taking a look at the Art Deco rug collection at Doris Leslie Blau > (http://www.dorisleslieblau.com/deco-rugs/)

By Jeanine Hays (www.aphrochicshop.com)