Deco Decadence

Deco pic 1              {via ArchDigest}

With the holidays fully in swing and the longer nights that accompany them, we’ve begun to carve out time for movie nights. Last night we indulged (again) in viewing Gatsby. While critics of the movie’s portrayal of the F. Scott Fitzgerald novel are mixed, the sumptuous visuals of this Jazz Age tale won loyal fans across the board. Set in what can be agreed was a time of fantastic excess and opulence, the movie delivers on every front in terms of lavish interior design fantasy and a celebration of the height of Art Deco style. 
Deco pic 2
            {via ArchDigest}
What makes this visual arts design style unique is its fine ornamentation and often pulsating use of bold geometric motifs. It is a style that celebrates symmetry and rich colors. It is opulent and overdone while still embracing a fully modern aesthetic. Done well, Art Deco is unapologetically glamorous and right at home even in contemporary interiors. In Gatsby, we see filmmaker Baz Luhrmann and his wife designer Catherine Martin marry the style with gilded French furnishings and luxurious high-end upholstery. It is a fitting look for the flamboyant lifestyle featured in the film. Yet what makes Art Deco designs so easy to work with today is the ease of incorporation into all styles of interiors. The intricate details and mathematically precise patterns make it an obvious choice for more streamlined interiors with sleek furnishings.
PastedGraphic-5                                      {French Art Deco rug via Doris Leslie Blau Rugs}
From our collection of vintage & antique rugs, this magnificent French Art Deco specimen is a prime example of the hypnotic spell often cast by Art Deco. Just look at the skilled use of pattern, color and symmetry. While much of Art Deco leverages crisp geometric lines, this rug honors the curvilinear motif also popular at the time. Designed by painter and decorative artist Rene Crevel, this spectacular rug from the ’30s is a showstopper. The reds, lavender, grays and blacks radiate out in an undulating rhythm worthy of an Academy Award Winning Luhrmann scene.
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                                                                  {Art Deco rug via Doris Leslie Blau Rugs }
The previous design wins points for its adherence to Art Deco curves. This one-of-a-kind option from the 1920’s marries geometry, period colors and a very unusual octagonal shape to captivate the eyes. The use of triangles and serrated forms in an outwardly radiant design almost makes the concentric rings dances with visual movement. Like the previous rug, this style calls to mind a kaleidoscope effect that pays strict attention to symmetry and mirrored patterns.
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                                 {Chinese Art Deco rug via Doris Leslie Blau Rugs}
Art Deco comes in many forms. This Chinese rug shows you a bit of the period’s more freeform side. What it lacks in perfect symmetry it makes up for in its use of bold colors and an imaginative abstract design. Brilliant flowers seems to explode from the more disciplined trellis center. Created in the 1940’s this marvelous rug epitomizes the frenetic energy of the period and the power of the creative voice of artists skilled at representing the style. This beautiful organic design makes no apologies for its vivid floral and unusual sea green ground. A work of art designed to add powerful personality to a room.
Art Deco influences have been seeing an uptick in popularity from furniture manufacturers and designers alike for several years. Yet the allure of Art Deco has never really gone out of fashion. Whether you gravitate towards strict symmetry or the unpredictability of an abstract design, there’s a sweet spot for all of us in the realm of Art Deco. For an easy glance at the many rug options available to you that honor this period, be sure to view our collection of Art Deco inspired rugs. The right one will set the stage for your own magnificent life story for years to come.
By Franki Durbin

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